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Goshen High School Course Descriptions


Goshen High School offers a wide array of core courses that help students meet graduation requirements, as well as a broad selection of elective and college-level classes designed to help students find their passion and prepare for life after high school graduation. Use the links below to learn more about what is available to students.  Use the links below to learn more about current and previously offered courses.  Please note, not all courses listed are offered to students every year.  A list of course offerings for the upcoming school year is provided to students in December.

Business Education | EnglishFamily & Consumer Science | Fine and Visual Arts | Health and Physical Education | Mathematics | Music | Science | Social Studies | Special Education | STEAM  | World Languages

Business Education Courses

Business Computer Applications

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Students will explore computer skills and applications needed on a personal, school/college, and career level. The focus of this course is to provide knowledge and skills associated with Google applications including: Docs, Slides, and Sheets. Students will create various documents: reports, business letters, tables, databases, spreadsheets, and brochures. In addition, students will expand their knowledge of computer terminology, parts of a computer, and search strategies on the Internet. Students will also learn to properly type, without looking, 45+ words per minute. A very necessary skill in today’s work world!

Personal Financial Math (formerly Business Math)

Grades 11-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Personal Finance courses provide students with an understanding of the concepts involved in managing one’s personal finances. The course emphasizes lifespan goal-setting, individual and family decision-making, and topics that are commonly associated with personal finance so that one can become a financially responsible consumer. Topics may include savings, paying for college, credit, insurance, taxes, and budget planning.

Introductory Accounting

Grades 11-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

This course is highly recommended for students planning to major in any field of business and/or accounting in college. Accounting introduces students to and expands their knowledge of the fundamental accounting principles and procedures used in businesses. Course content includes the recording and completion of the accounting cycle, payroll, taxes, debts, depreciation, and periodic adjustments through a computerized accounting program. Students may learn how to apply standard auditing principles and to prepare budgets and final reports.

Career Internship

Grades 11-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Internship experience! This course allows students to leave school to complete an internship experience in one or two different careers of interest. Explore careers in television/radio, child care, journalism, teaching, and other occupations of interest. This opportunity allows students to gain insight into the skills and educational requirements of a career prior to college. Students planning to enroll in School-to-Work need to provide their own transportation to and from their placements. Students who choose to enroll in this elective course are expected to demonstrate a level of responsibility and commitment appropriate for the workplace. Characteristics such as honesty, integrity, ethics, teamwork, and a positive attitude are expected. Students will intern three days per week (Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday) and will meet twice per week in class (Thursday/Friday) for classroom instruction.

Vocational Internship Program

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

The Vocational Internship course will offer students the opportunity to work closely with an expert in a trade field the student chooses.  The internship is a chance to observe, up close and personal, what students can only imagine before actually doing it.  Each internship will be individually designed to meet the students’ interests.  Students will be placed in fields such as Cosmetology, Carpentry, Electrical Construction, HVAC/Plumbing, Welding, Esthetics, Culinary, Animal Science, Fire Science, Law Enforcement, Auto Mechanics, and Fashion.

Entrepreneurship

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Start your own business! Learn how to be a smarter customer! What does achieving the “American Dream” of owning and operating a business really involve? Students choose a business of interest from restaurants to clothing stores and spas and develop a business plan. On top of that, students will complete Shark Tank challenges. Groups of students will compete in business-related challenges to gain first-hand experience on how to own and operate a business. Tasks can range from developing your own brand/product line to creating a NYC window display. Topics include advertising, finance, marketing, business and labor law, risk and strategic management, managing a staff, and other areas related to an entrepreneurial venture.

SUNY Orange Introduction to Business

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Great class for all students majoring in Business! Great for students interested in Business! College credit is being offered for this SUNY Orange course. The course surveys an array of topics and concepts related to the field of business. These courses introduce business concepts such as banking and finance, the role of government in business, consumerism, credit, investment, and management. usually provide a brief overview of the American economic system, small businesses, and corporate organizations. Introductory Business courses may also expose students to the varied opportunities in administration, accounting, management, and related fields.

Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) Sports Management

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

SPM 205 introduces the student to sport management concepts and sectors through an examination of problems and issues faced by contemporary sport management. Unique characteristics of sport and resulting social and ethical responsibilities of sport managers will be discussed.  Students are responsible for tuition and textbook costs. Some students may qualify for financial assistance. See your school counselor for details.

Social Media Marketing

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Social media has changed the way we communicate and conduct business.  Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Youtube – learn how to use these powerful tools to your advantage.  Explore how businesses use social media as an advertising and marketing tool and the impact it has on consumers.

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English Courses and Electives

English Department Course Descriptions Aligned with NYS

English 9

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

English 9, a one year, one-credit course, provides the groundwork for students’ high school English studies by surveying the major literary genres and examining nonfiction companion pieces in conjunction with Common Core while also linking writing activities to the reading selections. Ninth grade ELA courses build upon students’ prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing and include the four aspects of language use: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. A focus of the course is mastery of effective paragraph format, controlling ideas, rich and specific support of those controlling ideas, and the multi‐paragraph essay. Clear, organized, and supported writing is stressed. Students will be introduced to several essay forms throughout the year, aligning with Next Generation Standards. MLA Format, research techniques, and the research paper form are taught, and a final short research paper is required.

English 9 Honors

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 92% earned in previous English Regents-level course and score above the 70% on the MAPS Assessment.

Students interested in enrolling in the Honors program who have between an 88 and 89 average will be reviewed and contacted from the high school at the beginning of the summer.

English 9H follows the course description of English 9 but also develops literary analysis in which the students develop writing through language, style, and voice as a means to think critically while making global connections. To achieve the literary analysis, students will read most of the literature independently and closely. Students will also be introduced to literary criticism. English 9H has specific prerequisites and course requirements, including but not limited to required summer work.

English 10

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

English 10 is a one year, one-credit course that provides a chronological survey of literary works from around the world. The course may include the earliest known writings from the Fertile Crescent, then travels around the world and through the ages to cover ancient Hebrew, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman literature. In addition, students study writings from the Middle East, Africa, Asia, the Americas, and European literature.  Through the study of various genres of literature, students can improve their reading rate and comprehension and develop the skills to determine the author’s intent and theme and to recognize the techniques used by the author to deliver his or her message. Tenth grade ELA courses offer a balanced focus on composition and literature. Students learn about the alternate aims and audiences of written compositions by writing persuasive, critical, and creative multi-paragraph essays, and compositions as part of the Next Generation Standards.  Research is another focus of this course in which students create one formal research paper following MLA format during the year. Throughout the year, grammar, vocabulary, spelling, and oral and written presentation skills are practiced and refined.

English 10 Honors

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 85% from previous English Honors course or 90% earned in previous English Regents-level course, and score at least in the Green zone on the STAR Exam.

English 10H follows the English 10 course but students will read more selections and are expected to develop an ability to read more closely in order to gain greater insights into literary works and the eras and cultures that produced them. Writing instruction moves beyond mere mastery of skills to the effective application of advanced skills to create more powerful, descriptive, and persuasive prose. There is an emphasis on deep revision and advanced use of textual support. Oral presentation skills and class discussion are also emphasized in the honors level classes.  English 10H has specific prerequisites and course requirements, including but not limited to required summer work.

English 11

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

English 11 is a one year, one-credit course in which students explore the development of American literature, potentially beginning with Native American myths and tales, then continuing with a study of Colonial writings, and culminating with contemporary American literature. Significant literary movements examined include Romanticism, Transcendentalism, women’s literature, and the Harlem Renaissance. Students read, interpret, question, analyze, and synthesize writings related to the works studied. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they identify the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works and determine how the literature reflects the society of the time.  In preparation for the Common Core Exam, students hone skills in reading comprehension, analysis of technical reading, recognition and application of literary devices and argumentative writing. Students’ writing in their junior year concentrates primarily on literary analysis and the argument as students prepare for the Common Core Exam. Additional writings include expository, narrative, and creative in accordance with the Next Generation Standards. Students are required to write one formal research paper following the MLA format, particularly focusing on argument. Throughout the year, grammar, vocabulary, spelling, and oral and written presentation skills are practiced and refined.

English 11 Honors

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 85% from previous English Honors course or 90% earned in previous English Regents-level course, score at least in the Green zone on STAR Exam, and teacher recommendation.

English 11H follows the English 11 course but offers a greatly enriched content. Students will read additional selections and are expected to develop an ability to read more closely in order to gain greater insights into literary works and the times and cultures that produced them. Writing instruction moves beyond mere mastery of skills to the effective application of rhetorical and literary devices to create more powerful, descriptive, and persuasive prose. There is an emphasis on deep revision and advanced use of textual support. Oral presentation skills and class discussion are also emphasized in the honors level classes.  English 11H has specific prerequisites and course requirements, including but not limited to required summer work.

AP Language & Composition 11

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 85% from previous English Honors course or 90% earned in previous English Regents-level course, score at least in the Green zone on STAR Exam, and teacher recommendation.

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level English courses, AP English Language and Composition courses expose students to prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. These courses emphasize the interaction of authorial purpose, intended audience, and the subject at hand, and through them, students learn to develop stylistic flexibility as they write compositions covering a variety of subjects that are intended for various purposes.  With an emphasis on close reading of complex, provocative, and advanced texts, students will examine the works of writers, advertisers, politicians, artists and thinkers in great detail. Using these models, crisp, clear, focused and supported writing is the goal this year. Since the writing process is time consuming and cumulative, deep revision is expected for much writing. In addition to rhetoric and composition, students write two research papers. MLA format is crucial and scholarly efforts are necessary. Students must be willing to accept constructive criticism to develop critical thinking, focused arguments, and clarity in speech and writing.  English 11AP: Language and Composition has specific prerequisites and course requirements, including but not limited to required summer work.

English AP Literature & Composition

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 85% FROM PREVIOUS ENGLISH HONORS COURSE OR 90% EARNED IN PREVIOUS ENGLISH REGENTS-LEVEL COURSE AND SCORE AT LEAST AN 85 ON THE ELA REGENTS EXAM,  SCORE AT LEAST IN THE GREEN ZONE ON STAR EXAM, AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATION.

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level English courses, AP English Literature and Composition courses enable students to develop critical standards for evaluating literature. Students study the language, character, action, and theme in works of recognized literary merit; enrich their understanding of connotation, metaphor, irony, syntax, and tone; and write compositions of their own (including literary analysis, exposition, argument, narrative, and creative writing).  Works of recognized literary merit are examined not only to discover what an author is saying, but also how he or she uses literary elements and devices to convey themes. Written assignments include in-class and take-home essays, a major research paper, and oral presentations. The class is also designed to prepare students to take the AP Exam in May. Students scoring well enough on the exam may be eligible for college credit.  English 12AP: Literature and Composition has specific prerequisites and course requirements, including but not limited to required summer work.

SUNY Orange Freshman English I

Grade 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 85% FROM PREVIOUS ENGLISH HONORS COURSE OR 90% EARNED IN PREVIOUS ENGLISH REGENTS-LEVEL COURSE, SCORE AT LEAST AN 85 ON THE ELA REGENTS EXAM, HAVE AN OVERALL 85 GPA, AND SCORE AT LEAST IN THE GREEN ZONE ON STAR EXAM.

This first semester-long course in SUNY Orange Freshman English sequence introduces college-level pre-writing, organization, revision, construction of a variety of essays, and research skills. Students will develop writing style and voice through posts and paragraphs.  Class discussion centers on the formal and informal essay in several formats: description, narration, illustration, comparison, persuasion, and literary analysis. Although composition courses may present some opportunities for creative writing, their focus usually remains on nonfiction, scholarly, or formal writing. Several short readings are used to supplement instruction in various essay formats. An MLA research paper is required.  An in-class written Midterm and Final are requirements of the course.  Upon successful completion of each course, students receive three SUNY Orange Community College credits, which may be transferable to all SUNY schools and most four-year colleges nationwide. SUNY Orange Freshman English 1 has specific prerequisites and course requirements, including but not limited to required summer work.

SUNY Orange Freshman English 2

Grade 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: 85% from previous English Honors course or 90% earned in previous English Regents-level course, score at least an 85 on the ELA Regents Exam, have an over-all 85 GPA, and score at least in the Green zone on STAR Exam.

The second course, Freshman English II, is a semester-long literature writing course based on fiction, drama, and poetry. Students will study and analyze the elements of literature and how they contribute to the theme. Selected literature will explore a particular theme as expressed from several points of view. Such themes might include but are not limited to Gender, The American Dream, Society and Self, and Race and Culture.  As a writing intensive course, students are expected to write both formal and informal essays including a literary research essay. An in-class written Midterm and Final are requirements of the course. Upon successful completion of each course, students receive three SUNY Orange Community College credits, which may be transferable to all SUNY schools and most four-year colleges nationwide. SUNY Orange Freshman English 2 has specific prerequisites and course requirements, including but not limited to required summer work.  Prerequisite: Passed SUNY Orange Freshman English 1.

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College Prep English 12 Honors

Optional in lieu of English 12 Semester

Grade 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: 85% from previous English Honors course or 90% earned in previous English Regents-level course, at least an 85 on the ELA Regents, score at least in the Green zone on STAR Exam, and teacher recommendation.

English 12: College Preparation Honors, a half-year semester-long course similar to English 12 Semester, is designed to enrich literacy for both college and career readiness students but includes a more rigorous curriculum emphasizing college readiness.  Students will study and practice various forms of writing from the narrative to research.  During the semester, students will practice all aspects of the writing process: brainstorming, organizing, drafting, editing, revising.  During the research unit, students will research effectively and efficiently from reliable sources, specifically primary and secondary sources from databases, identify and fact-check false information, address fallacious reasoning and rhetorical appeals, and communicate their findings via written and oral reports.  Students will complete a required Media Literacy Unit. Students will be required to complete one research activity using MLA format; however, students will be introduced to one other research style prior to graduation, e.g., APA or Chicago. Furthermore, students will practice verbal and nonverbal communication skills as they explore the various types of communication in both the academic and working worlds post-high school. In addition to writing and researching, students will read various literary forms (fiction, drama, and poetry) with attention to characterization, plot development and structure, use of figurative language, and understanding of literary techniques. Beyond discussions, the process of writing critical essays in response to literature will be studied. Through both literature and writing, in addition to academics, attention will be given to social-emotional learning. After completion of this course, students may take any other senior English elective, including the SUPA English class Creative NonFiction if they earn an 85 on the ELA Regents.

Contemporary Drama and Composition

Grade 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Contemporary Drama, a half-credit semester-long course, addresses 21st-century issues and presents them in an engaging and accessible form. While students are exposed to many classic plays throughout their grade school education, they are often unfamiliar with modern works that take a creative approach to tackle relatable issues. Student engagement will focus on reading and acting out of many different types of plays and discussing how the writing and staging of each affect the various themes. Emphasis is placed on comprehension, discernment, and critical-thinking skills in the reading of texts and literature. These courses introduce and explore more advanced literary techniques (irony, satire, humor, connotation, tone, rhythm, symbolism, and so on) through literary genres, with the aim of creating sophisticated readers. Texts may include but are not limited to From Lillian Hellman’s The Children’s Hour, which was written in 1934 and addresses the issue of sexual identity in society, to Christopher Demos-Brown’s recently produced American Son, which addresses the effects of racial stereotyping. There is a century’s worth of work to explore. Additionally, the course blends composition and literature into a cohesive whole as students write critical and comparative analyses of selected literature, continuing to develop their language arts skills. Typically, writing assignments are required as an additional method to develop and improve critical-thinking and analytic skills, including multi-paragraph essays and source-based essays.

Creative Writing

Grade 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Creative Writing, a half-credit semester-long course, offers students the opportunity to develop and improve their technique and individual style in poetry, short story, drama, essays, and other forms of prose, including flash fiction and creative nonfiction. The emphasis of the course is on writing; however, students may study exemplary representations and authors to obtain a fuller appreciation of the form and craft. Close analysis of the works of classic and contemporary authors will offer students the opportunity to explore literary elements and rhetorical devices that contribute to the development of distinct voice and style.  By uncovering the layers of meaning within these various texts, students will learn techniques that will enrich and strengthen their own writing. This creative writing course will cover several expressive forms.  Writing as a process will be encouraged through journal entries, brainstorming, drafting, revising, and editing.  In a supportive workshop environment, students will not only hone their own writing skills but also read the work of their peers, offering praise and constructive criticism.  The exchange of ideas will spark creativity and introspection, which will translate into a better finished product.

Multicultural Literature and Composition

Grade 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Multicultural Literature, a half-credit semester-long course, integrates writing for a variety of purposes and audiences with literature study (short fiction, poetry, drama, novel) that reflects different cultures.  Emphasis is placed on diverse texts while writing activities may include a focus on argumentative, expository, comparison, and narrative modes. Along with exploring universal themes, students will recognize how cultural influences impact how we view the world. Emphasis is placed on comprehension, discernment, and critical-thinking skills in the reading of texts and literature. These courses introduce and explore more advanced literary techniques (irony, satire, humor, connotation, tone, rhythm, symbolism, and so on) through two or more literary genres, with the aim of creating sophisticated readers. The course blends composition and literature into a cohesive whole as students write critical and comparative analyses of selected literature, continuing to develop their language arts skills. Writing will be both informal and formal.  Typically, writing assignments are required as an additional method to develop and improve critical-thinking and analytic skills, including multi-paragraph essays and source-based essays.

English 12 (Semester)

REQUIRED for Seniors not taking either AP Literature and Composition or SUNY Orange Freshman English 1

Grade 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

English 12, a half-year semester-long course, is designed to enrich literacy for both college and career readiness students.  Students will study and practice various forms of writing from the narrative to research.  During the semester, students will practice all aspects of the writing process: brainstorming, organizing, drafting, editing, revising.  During the research unit, students will research effectively and efficiently from reliable sources, specifically primary and secondary sources from databases, identify and fact-check false information, address fallacious reasoning and rhetorical appeals, and communicate their findings via written and oral reports.  Students will be required to complete one research activity using MLA format; however, students will be introduced to one other research style prior to graduation, e.g., APA or Chicago. Furthermore, students will practice verbal and nonverbal communication skills as they explore the various types of communication in both the academic and working worlds post-high school. In addition to writing and researching, students will read various literary forms (fiction, drama, and poetry) with attention to characterization, plot development and structure, use of figurative language, and understanding of literary techniques. Beyond discussions, the process of writing critical essays in response to literature will be studied. Through both literature and writing, in addition to academics, attention will be given to social-emotional learning.

English 12

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

English 12 is a full-year course designed to enrich literacy for both college and career readiness students. English 12 further blends composition and literature into a cohesive whole as students write critical and comparative analyses of selected literature, continuing to develop their language arts skills. Students will also be introduced to a sampling of the other senior English electives throughout the year-long course. Students primarily write multi-paragraph essays, but they may also write one or more major research papers. Students will study and practice various forms of writing from the narrative to research.  During both semesters, students will practice all aspects of the writing process: brainstorming, organizing, drafting, editing, revising.  During the research unit, students will research effectively and efficiently from reliable sources, specifically primary and secondary sources from databases, identify and fact-check false information, address fallacious reasoning and rhetorical appeals, and communicate their findings via written and oral reports.  Students will be required to complete one research activity using MLA format; however, students will be introduced to one other research style prior to graduation. Furthermore, students will practice verbal and nonverbal communication skills as they explore the various types of communication in both the academic and working worlds post-high school. In addition to writing and researching, students will read various literary forms (fiction, drama, and poetry) with attention to characterization, plot development and structure, use of figurative language, and understanding of literary techniques. Beyond discussions, the process of writing critical essays in response to literature will be studied. Through both literature and writing, in addition to academics, attention will be given to social-emotional learning.

SUPA (Syracuse University Project Advance) Gender and Literary Texts

Grade 12 – One Semester  – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 85% GPA, 85% ON ELA REGENTS EXAM AND 85% FROM PREVIOUS ENGLISH 11 HONORS OR AP COURSE OR 90% FROM PREVIOUS REGENTS-LEVEL ENGLISH COURSE.

ENG 192: Gender & Literary Texts explores the “construction and representation of ‘gender,’ especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts. The course foregrounds readers’ interpretive practices, i.e., how we read and make meaning in texts, particularly if we interpret them using the premise that gender is a social construct—rather than a natural, ahistorical “essence” that somehow “expresses” our true “selves.” To examine the ways in which literature participates in the social reproduction of gender, as well as the difference that gender makes in the production and reception of literary texts, students will practice extensive close reading, evidence-based analysis and argumentation, and independent-inquiry. Raising awareness of how meanings are created through acts of critical reading, students will thus learn to analyze the ways texts construct categories of difference, including differences of gender, race and social class. Additionally, the course blends composition and literature into a cohesive whole as students write critical and comparative analyses of selected literature, continuing to develop their language arts skills. Typically, writing assignments are required as an additional method to develop and improve critical-thinking and analytic skills, including multi-paragraph essays and source-based essays.  ENG 192: Gender & Literary Texts has specific prerequisites and course requirements, including but not limited to required summer work.

SUPA (Syracuse University Project Advance) Writing Culture: Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

Grade 12 – One Semester  – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 85% from previous English Honors course or 90% earned in previous English Regents-level course, score at least an 85 on the ELA Regents Exam, score at least in the Green zone on STAR Exam, and teacher recommendation.

Writing 114 provides an introduction to creative nonfiction (CNF), a genre that encompasses many kinds of prose: memoir, biography, travel writing, science writing, and literary journalism, to name a few. CNF writers almost always—in some way or other—focus on the tensions that emerge between individuals and the world around them. Thus, the title of this course, “Writing Culture,” refers to writing about oneself and others in the context of a broader culture. How do we negotiate cultural norms, expectations, rituals, and practices? How does culture shape us as individuals? To what degree do we absorb or resist our cultural influences? And how do we, as individual actors and witnesses to our world, shape the culture in which we live? These are just a few of the many questions we’ll ask ourselves as we move through this course. In this class, students will read and reflect upon a variety of creative nonfiction texts, as well as compose their own essays. Students will have the freedom to explore a wide range of topics and experiment broadly with voice, style, form, and the use of research to enrich their writing. Rather than present reality as a series of raw facts, CNF writers borrow techniques of fiction writing— description, anecdote, scene construction, characterization, and dialogue—to tell dynamic and compelling true stories. The crucial distinction between creative nonfiction and fiction is that nonfiction purports to tell the truth with very little embellishment, while fiction claims to be “made up.” Creative nonfiction also draws from poetic approaches to language, including imagery, metaphor, tone, and shifts in point of view and perspective. Students will study these building blocks of creative nonfiction and use them in the composition process.  WRT 114 – Writing Culture: Introduction to Creative Nonfiction has specific prerequisites and course requirements.

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Family and Consumer Science Courses

Foods I

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Formerly known as Food and Nutrition, Food Preparation and Health Management courses provide students with an understanding of food’s role in society, instruction in how to plan and prepare meals, and information about the nutritional and health benefits of minimizing processed and prepared food and pre packaged/prepared meals from one’s diet. These courses not only build on the basic skills of food preparation but also address financial considerations and recipe conversion to make foods healthier. Some courses place a heavier emphasis on a balanced diet, while others concentrate on specific types of food preparation (such as low sodium, low fat, or increased whole foods). These courses will also address current issues such as organic foods and vegan cooking.

Foods II

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: FOODS I

This course provides students with advanced culinary skills and techniques needed to prepare and serve a variety of foods. Students will be introduced to the diversity of global foods and how to incorporate whole foods into daily cooking and limit processed and pre-prepared foods in their already existing diets. New ingredients and tools will be used to broaden the scope of learning such as fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, and various herbs and spices. Students will be actively involved in planning, preparing, and evaluating a diverse selection of new recipes and meals. Career opportunities in the culinary field will be explored through a variety of guest speakers.

Fashion I

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Clothing/Sewing courses introduce students to and expand their knowledge of various aspects of wearing apparel, sewing and fashion.  This course includes wardrobe planning, selection, care and repair of ready to wear clothing.  Students will learn how to use a sewing machine, basic clothing construction skills, and use of small equipment.

(Satisfactory completion of Fashion I + Interior Design may be used to fulfill the one credit of Art/Music required for graduation.)

Fashion II

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: FASHION I

This course provides students with the opportunity to use clothing and textiles as a medium for artistic expression.  It is designed to build upon skills acquired in Fashion 1.  The focus will be on clothing construction,  including selection of patterns and fabrics, alterations, organization of work time and details of construction.

Family Living

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

This course emphasizes building and maintaining healthy interpersonal relationships among family members and other members of society. These courses often emphasize (but are not limited to) topics such as the responsibilities of a family and wage earner, balancing a career and personal life, human sexuality, marriage preparation, parenthood and the function of the family unit, the family life cycle, and life stages. They also cover topics related to stages of growth and social/dating practices. Students in this course will learn about humans from the very start of conception all the way to late adulthood. We analyze many controversial topics such as Shaken Baby Syndrome, Teen Parenting, Social Justice issues, and Social Media. The students will have the option to take home a Real Care Baby that will provide an authentic learning experience and teach them what it feels like to have an infant at such a young age. A variety of guest speakers will be invited into our classroom to elaborate on topics such as prenatal care.

Interior Design

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

This course provides students with knowledge and skills regarding interior design and decoration of the home for the individual or family. While exploring design principles, personal needs, and style and decision making, students have an opportunity to explore such topics as color, texture, furniture styles and arrangement, window treatments, floor/wall coverings and home improvement/modification. These courses  emphasize personal use and application of home elements and principles of design.

(Satisfactory completion of Interior Design + Fashion I may be used to fulfill the one credit of Art/Music required for graduation.)

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Fine and Visual Arts Courses

Art History 1

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

In the Art History 1 course, students are introduced to significant works of art, artists, and artistic movements that have shaped the art world and influenced or reflected various periods of history. Course content emphasizes the evolution of art forms, techniques, symbols, and themes. The course covers the relationship of art to social, political, and historical events throughout the world, while covering multiple artists, traditional and contemporary aesthetic issues, and the development of art. Critical analysis of visual images, as they communicate and express the history, needs, and ideals of society and individuals is included. The focus of this comprehensive course is on expression of ideas through application of a variety of media, study of historical and contemporary art and artists from a worldwide perspective, and critical analysis and exploration of techniques as they communicate and express the history, needs, and ideals of society and individuals. This course meets the art graduation requirement if both Art History 1 and Art History 2 are taken.

Art History 2

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: ART HISTORY 1

In the Art History 2 course, students build upon their learning from the Art History 1 class. Students are introduced to significant works of art, artists, and artistic movements that have shaped the art world and influenced or reflected various periods of history. Course content emphasizes the evolution of art forms, techniques, symbols, and themes. The course covers the relationship of art to social, political, and historical events throughout the world, while covering multiple artists, traditional and contemporary aesthetic issues, and the development of art. Critical analysis of visual images, as they communicate and express the history, needs, and ideals of society and individuals is included. The focus of this comprehensive course is on expression of ideas through application of a variety of media, study of historical and contemporary art and artists from a worldwide perspective, and critical analysis and exploration of techniques as they communicate and express the history, needs, and ideals of society and individuals. This course meets the art graduation requirement if both Art History 1 and Art History 2 are taken.

Studio in Art

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

In the Studio in Art class, students are introduced to the fundamentals of artistic expression. This course includes experiences in drawing, painting, two-and three-dimensional design, and sculpture. This course emphasizes observation and interpretation of the visual environment, visual communication, imagination, and symbolism through an introduction to various visual arts media. The focus of this comprehensive course is the study of how artists convey ideas through application of a variety of media, and the study of historical and contemporary art and artists from a worldwide perspective. This course meets the art/music graduation requirement.

Digital Photography 1

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: STUDIO ART

Photography courses provide students with an understanding of photographic media, techniques, and processes. These courses focus on the development of photographic compositions through manipulation of the fundamental processes of artistic expression. Students in Digital Photography 1 learn to make meaningful visual statements with an emphasis on personal creative expression to communicate ideas, feelings, or values. Students learn the technical aspects of using a digital camera and manual photography. Photography courses may also include the history of photography, historic movements, image manipulation, critical analysis, and some creative special effects which will be made primarily in Adobe Photoshop or Lightroom. Students engage in critiques of their photographic images, the works of other students, and those by professional photographers.

Digital Photography 2

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

In this course, students build upon their learning from Digital Photography 1. Photography courses provide students with an understanding of photographic media, techniques, and processes. Students continue to learn about the technical aspect of shooting digital photography using a digital camera. These courses focus on the development of photographic compositions through manipulation of the fundamental processes of artistic expression. Students in Digital Photography 2 learn to make meaningful visual statements with an emphasis on personal creative expression to communicate ideas, feelings, or values. Photography courses may also include the history of photography, historic movements, image manipulation, critical analysis, and some creative special effects. Students continue to use Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom to edit photos. Students engage in critiques of their photographic images, the works of other students, and those by professional photographers.

Graphic Art & Design

Formerly known as Visual Communication (Graphic Design) 1

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: STUDIO ART

The Visual Communication Design course emphasizes applying fundamental processes of artistic expression through the exploration of the purposeful arrangement of images, symbols, and text to communicate a message. This course may include investigations of how technology influences the creation of graphic and digital designs and study historical and contemporary visual communications design. This course also provides instruction in the process of responding to his/her own art for the purpose of reflecting and refining work, and analyzing the work of others, including master designers, for the purpose of interpreting meaning.  This course introduces how to use Adobe Creative Suite applications to create graphic designs.

Drawing and Painting

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: STUDIO ART

Drawing and Painting courses focus on the interrelationships that occur between drawing and painting using a variety of media and techniques, emphasizing observation and interpretation of the visual environment. These courses typically include applying various media, mark making, and compositional strategies; along with a study of art and artists from a worldwide perspective and instruction in the critique process.

Advanced Studio in Drawing

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: DRAWING AND PAINTING

This is a drawing course using a variety of media and techniques, emphasizing observation and interpretation of the visual environment. This course will include applying various media, mark making, and compositional strategies; along with a study of art and artists from a worldwide perspective and instruction in the critique process. Students will refine their creative drawing process and develop their own artistic exploration, following and breaking from traditional conventions.

Advanced Studio in Painting

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: DRAWING AND PAINTING

This is a painting course using a variety of media and techniques, emphasizing observation and interpretation of the visual environment. This course will include applying various media, mark making, and compositional strategies; along with a study of art and artists from a worldwide perspective and instruction in the critique process. Students will refine their creative painting process and develop their own artistic exploration, following and breaking from traditional conventions.

Sculpture

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: STUDIO ART

This Sculpture course promotes expression of ideas through three-dimensional works. Students explore representational and abstract sculpture through subtractive (carving), additive (modeling), and assemblage techniques in one or more media. A study of historical and contemporary sculpture and sculptors from a worldwide perspective, and instruction and practice in the critique process are addressed.

Ceramics (Pottery)

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: STUDIO ART

This Ceramics/Pottery course will engage students in a sequential learning experience that encompasses the history of ceramics, critiquing their own work and the work of others, aesthetic inquiry, and creative production. Students will develop knowledge of ceramic techniques and processes with an emphasis on design, craftsmanship, and expression. Experience includes, but is not limited to, clay modeling, hand building, coil building, and casting and throwing on the potter’s wheel. Students develop a working knowledge of kiln firing and glazing techniques.

Advanced Art Portfolio

Grades 9-12 – One Semester (Fall) – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: STUDIO ART AND AT LEAST TWO OTHER ART COURSES OR TEACHER RECOMMENDATION

This Portfolio class is only for art students who wish to pursue art as a major or minor after high school. This is a highly independent class in which students will work on determining a theme or focus of their choice and creating at least 12 college level artworks for submission to a college. Students are encouraged to work in any 2D or 3D art medium they choose. Art majors/minors that usually require a portfolio for admission at most colleges are: Fine Arts, Design, Digital Art, Game Arts, Film, Photography, Graphic Design, Illustration, Painting, Drawing, Architecture, Fashion, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Jewelry, Ceramics, Animation, etc.

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Health and Physical Education Courses

Physical Education

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1/2 Credit

Physical Education courses provide students with the knowledge, experience and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one of the  following sports and activities:  Team/Net sports,  Stress Management/ Recreational activities, Personal Fitness and Conditioning.  Physical Education focuses on the benefits of leading a healthy lifestyle. The grade level outcomes include components of personal wellness and the social-emotional factors that contribute to leading an enjoyable life, extending beyond graduation. An exploration into the different domains of resources and career options are explored. Competency of various motor skills and movement patterns is demonstrated. Physical Education prepares students as they transition to post-secondary life. Students design and implement personal wellness plans that promote lifelong physical activity and fitness. Health-enhancing behaviors, such as nutrition and social-emotional factors, are included in the plan. Students apply effective habits of personal and social behaviors, as well as an exploration into the different domains of resources, other than school, to continue the practices of physical activities.

Personal Fitness/Strength and Conditioning

Grades 10-12 – Full Year – 1/2 Credit

This course is designed to promote lifelong health/wellness by teaching students how to maintain/improve their health through personal fitness as well as strength and conditioning. Students will explore concepts related to the health benefits of exercise, proper exercise techniques, exercise intensity, target heart rate, and creating personalized fitness plans. Strength and conditioning for various sports and fitness related activities will be incorporated to promote improvement in strength, endurance, balance, agility and speed. Students will engage in activities such as weight training, kickboxing, aerobics, hiking and walking/running, exercise machines and conditioning activities. Proper technique, safety precautions and proper application of the Principles of Training will be emphasized. Students are expected to actively participate and wear appropriate athletic attire to each class. This course meets every other day for a year.

Team and Net Sports

Grades 10-12 – Full Year – 1/2 Credit

Team and Net Sports introduces and examines the concepts of strategy and tactics in a multitude of team and net sports. Students will be encouraged to build teamwork while playing some of the following: basketball, soccer, flag football, floor hockey, speedball, Tchoukball, handball, volleyball, tennis, badminton, pickleball, and nitro ball, among others. Students will also be introduced to rule interpretation and officiating. Students are expected to actively participate and wear appropriate athletic attire to each class. This course meets every other day for a year.

Stress Management/Lifetime and Recreational Activities

Grades 10-12 – Full Year – 1/2 Credit

This course examines the ways stress impacts the body as well as what lifetime sports are and why they are popular among adults. Students will learn about the stress response, the importance of stress relief to the body and mind, and healthy methods of relieving stress including yoga, tai chi, meditation, relaxation techniques, connecting to nature, and body awareness/mindfulness. Students will also explore various activities that are often played after high school, including golf, self-defense/kickboxing, archery, orienteering, biking, and lawn sports such as bocce ball, horseshoes, Can Jam, and more. Students are expected to actively participate and wear appropriate athletic attire to each class. This course meets every other day for a year.

Health and Wellness

Grade 10 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

In this required, semester-long course, students will learn about and discuss the many challenges they will encounter concerning their relationships, their bodies, and their minds. Topics include: mental health issues (stress management, self-esteem, eating disorders, substance abuse and addiction, depression, suicide prevention); healthy relationships and teen dating violence; sexual health (hygiene, male and female reproductive systems, gender identity and sexual orientation, pregnancy and childbirth, sexually transmitted infections, contraceptive methods); parenting responsibilities and child abuse prevention. Students will learn to apply knowledge and skills to their own lives through interactive activities, guest speakers, and open class discussions.

First Aid and CPR

Grades 9-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Safety and First Aid courses provide specialized instruction in first aid techniques, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), relief of obstructed airways, and general safety procedures and behaviors. These courses may include such topics as an overview of community agencies and hotlines providing emergency care and information and opportunities for first aid and CPR certification.

Intro to Nutrition

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

This semester-long course is designed to promote lifelong wellness by teaching students how to improve their health through proper nutrition and healthy weight management.  Topics covered will include (but are not limited to) basic nutritional concepts, healthy weight maintenance, being food literate, ethics in the food industry, organic and clean eating, and the dangers of dietary supplements, diet fads, energy drinks, etc. This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Health for Life (Formerly known as Critical Health Issues)

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Health for Life (H4L) is a ½ credit, one-semester, elective course designed to prepare students for adult life. Through class discussions and hands-on activities, students will be provided with knowledge and skills needed to help them live a safe, healthy, and independent life. Students will be encouraged to think deeply, explore their personal views, and examine the world with a critical and discerning lens…all while practicing health-enhancing skills they can take with them into adulthood. This course may be used to satisfy the graduation requirement of a second half-credit of health.  This course is intended for upperclassmen only.

SUPA (Syracuse University Project Advance) Human Development and Sport

Grade 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Human Development and Sport, examines the dynamics of youth development, social change, and social inclusion in the context of sport. Students examine perspectives of youth development and principles of sport that facilitate personal, social, and cultural development. Students explore ways in which sport-for-development programs provide positive environments and opportunities for collaboration, social change, inclusion, and human enrichment. The connections of sport-based initiatives to community, national, and global developmental issues are explored.

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Mathematics

Algebra I

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

This is the first course of the New York State high school mathematics curriculum. The core of this course is a solid introduction to the principles and techniques of Algebra. Some topics covered include problem solving, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving and graphing quadratics, factoring, operations with polynomials, and statistics. Students will take the Algebra Regents exam at the conclusion of the course. Graphing calculator use will be introduced throughout the year.

Algebra I with AIS

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

This course is designed for the student who has struggled to pass math. Through the use of a class and an AIS period every other day, students will complete the first course of the New York State high school mathematics curriculum. The core of this course is a solid introduction to the principles and techniques of Algebra. Some topics covered include problem solving, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving and graphing quadratics, factoring, operations with polynomials, and statistics. Students will take the Algebra Regents exam at the conclusion of the course. Graphing calculator use will be introduced throughout the year.

Students will be placed in this class based upon their performance in prior math classes, scores on state assessments as well as teacher, guidance and/or administration recommendation.

Geometry

Grade 9/10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 1

This is the second course of the New York State mathematics curriculum. A solid foundation of geometric concepts will be developed through coordinate, Euclidian, analytical and transformational geometry. Other topics covered include proofs, parallel lines, similar triangles, congruent triangles, properties of polygons, area, volume and an introduction to right triangle trigonometry. Students will take the Geometry Regents exam at the conclusion of the course. Graphing calculator use will be introduced throughout.

Geometry Honors

Grade 9/10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 1 AND MEET THE HONORS CRITERIA (SEE BELOW)

This course is designed for the accelerated mathematics student. All the topics in the Geometry curriculum are covered in greater depth, as well as additional enrichment topics. Graphing calculator use will be introduced throughout the year.  Students will take the Geometry Regents exam at the conclusion of the course.

Integrated Geometry

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 1

This course will cover most of the New York State Geometry curriculum. A solid foundation of geometric concepts will be developed through coordinate, Euclidian, analytical and transformational geometry. Other topics covered include logic proofs, parallel lines, congruent triangles and properties of circles. Graphing calculator use will be introduced throughout the year. Students will not take the Geometry Regents exam at the conclusion of this course. A local final exam will be given instead.

Algebra 2

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: GEOMETRY

This is the third course of the New York State mathematics curriculum. Mathematical concepts are extended in the areas of rational expressions, radical expressions, transformations, geometry, probability, and statistics. Also provided is the study of complex numbers, relations and functions including composition, inverse, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and the trigonometric functions. Graphing calculators will be used throughout the year. Students will take the Algebra 2 Regents exam upon completion of this course.

Integrated Algebra 2 & Trig Topics

Grades 11/12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: GEOMETRY OR INTEGRATED GEOMETRY

This course is designed for the student who needs a foundation in Algebra 2 & Trig. Key concepts from the NYS curriculum will be taught in depth throughout the year. Topics include advanced algebra, simplifying rational expressions and radicals, solving rational equations, trigonometry, logarithmic functions and exponential functions. Graphing calculators will be used throughout the year. Students will not take the Algebra 2 Regents exam at the conclusion of this course. A local final exam will be given instead.

Algebra 2 Honors

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: GEOMETRY AND MEET HONORS CRITERIA (SEE BELOW)

This course is the second year of the high school accelerated math program. The topics covered include those of Algebra 2 but in greater depth. Concepts are extended and advanced topics are presented. Graphing calculators will be used throughout the year.  Students will take the Algebra 2 Regents exam upon completion of this course.

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Pre-Calculus

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 2

This course is designed to prepare students for college level math courses. Topics include: functions and their graphs, complex numbers, trigonometry with applications, and limit theory. Emphasis is placed on graphing rational and trigonometric functions. Graphing calculators will be used as an enrichment tool throughout the year.

Pre-Calculus Honors

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 2 AND MEET THE HONORS CRITERIA (SEE BELOW)

This course is designed to prepare students for a course in Calculus. It is the third year of the accelerated math program. Topics covered are those of Pre-calculus; however, concepts are extended and studied in greater depth. Conic sections, polar graphing, limit theory, matrix operations and the use of matrices to solve systems of equations will also be studied. Graphing calculators will be used as an enrichment tool throughout the year.

Pre-Calculus Topics

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 2

This course is designed for students who need a foundation in pre-calculus. Select topics will be taught throughout the year, including advanced trigonometry, solving and graphing polynomial and rational functions and limit theory. Graphing calculators will be used as an enrichment tool throughout the year.

AP Calculus

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: PRECALCULUS

This course is a college level course in Calculus of a single variable. Topics covered will include functions, limit theory, differential Calculus, integral Calculus and applications. In May, students will take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination. After the AP examination and before the conclusion of the school year, students will continue learning assorted Calculus 2 topics and will be responsible for a teacher-prepared final examination. Graphing calculators will be used as an enrichment tool throughout the year.

College Calculus

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: PRECALCULUS AND MEET THE CRITERIA SET BY MOUNT ST. MARY COLLEGE

This is a college course (currently being offered through Mount St. Mary College) in Calculus in a single variable. Topics covered will include functions, limit theory, differential Calculus, integral Calculus and applications.

College Statistics

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and meet the criteria set by dual enrollment college awarding credit.

This course is a college course which examines the general elements and principles of statistics. The course is broken into two parts; descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. Topics include: methods of summarizing and presenting data; measures of center, spread, and position; probability; binomial probability distribution; normal probability distribution; t-test; chi-square test; confidence intervals, hypothesis testing; and linear regression.

Honors Criteria:

To continue in an HONORS LEVEL math course a students must

  • Request an HONORS LEVEL math course when completing course selections
  • Have at least an 85 OVERALL AVERAGE in their current HONORS LEVEL math course
  • Have TEACHER PERMISSION  if their OVERALL AVERAGE in their current HONORS LEVEL math course is between 80 and 84
  • NOT have two marking periods BELOW AN 80 in their current HONORS LEVEL math course

To move or change from a REGENTS LEVEL into an HONORS LEVEL math course students must

  • Request an HONORS LEVEL math course when completing course selections
  • Have at least a 92 OVERALL AVERAGE in their current math course
  • Have a competitive score on any Regents Exam in their current math course

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Music

All courses in the music department are available to students in grades 9-12.

Concert Band

No Audition Required – Full Year – 1 or 1/2 Credit (based on scheduled section)

Band courses are designed to promote students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments and cover a variety of band literature styles, primarily for concert performances. The GHS Concert Band is an ensemble that includes students of all playing levels in grades 9 through 12. Anyone who plays a band instrument is welcome in the Concert Band. Throughout the school year, students in the Concert Band will improve their playing skills and musical knowledge as they learn new music and musical concepts. The Concert Band performs two concerts a year, marches for the Memorial Day Parade, and participates in our school’s graduation ceremony. Students in this band are also expected to attend small group lessons and practice their instrument throughout the school year.

Symphonic Band

Audition Required – Full Year – 1 Credit

Band courses are designed to promote students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments and cover a variety of band literature styles, primarily for concert performances. The GHS Symphonic Band is an auditioned ensemble made up of students in grades 9 through 12. The Symphonic Band gives students an opportunity to further their playing skills, perform more advanced repertoire, and continue their love of music while playing at a superior level. The Symphonic Band performs two concerts a year, marches for the Memorial Day Parade, and participates in our school’s graduation ceremony. Students in this band are also expected to attend small group lessons and practice their instrument throughout the school year.

Concert Choir

No Audition Required – Full Year – 1 or 1/2 Credit (based on scheduled section)

Chorus courses develop students’ vocal skills within the context of a large choral ensemble in which they can perform a variety of styles. These courses are designed to develop students’ vocal techniques and their ability to sing parts. Concert Choir is offered to students of all grade levels. Students are encouraged to enroll on an every-day basis, however, students can participate every other day for ½ credit if necessary. Any student with space in their schedule is encouraged to give chorus a try even if they have never sung in school before. Any and all are welcome to join!

Treble Choir (formerly Women’s Choir)

Audition Required – Full Year – 1/2 Credit

Chorus courses develop students’ vocal skills within the context of a large choral ensemble in which they can perform a variety of styles. These courses are designed to develop students’ vocal techniques and their ability to sing parts. Treble Choir meets every other day for the entire school year and is open to students who sing soprano or alto voice parts. Auditions are conducted in the spring for the following school year. Treble Choir helps students sing parts in a smaller setting with more difficult music. Young sopranos and altos in 8th grade are informed of our audition date so they may participate. Students may NOT add this to their schedule during the school year without written permission from Mrs. Scully.

Varsity Choir

Audition Required – Full Year – 1 Credit

Chorus courses develop students’ vocal skills within the context of a large choral ensemble in which they can perform a variety of styles. These courses are designed to develop students’ vocal techniques and their ability to sing parts. The students in Varsity Choir audition in the spring for the following school year. This course meets every day. Varsity Choir is designed to give students an opportunity to develop their singing skills to an advanced level. Those interested who are in 8th grade are informed of our audition date so they may participate. Students may NOT add this to their schedule during the school year without written permission from Mrs. Scully.

Jazz Voices

Audition Required – Full Year – 1/2 Credit

Chorus courses develop students’ vocal skills within the context of a large choral ensemble in which they can perform a variety of styles. These courses are designed to develop students’ vocal techniques and their ability to sing parts. Students in Jazz Voices audition in the spring for the following school year. The class meets every other day.  This very select group is designed to help students’ develop their technique and ability to hold the most difficult vocal parts. Jazz Voices focuses on jazz repertoire and harmonies.  Those interested who are in 8th grade are informed of our audition date so they may participate. Students may not add this to their schedule during the school year.

Music Theory I/II

One Semester per Course – 1/2 Credit for Each Course

Music theory courses provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of music. Although this course is open to students at any grade level, it is highly recommended that students who enroll have some musical background or interest. Theory is the technical explanation of musical sound and can be difficult for some students, especially those who do not have a prior background in music. This is a cumulative course. Students who need 1 year of credit must sign up for Music Theory 1 and Music Theory 2 within the same school year.

Chamber Orchestra

Audition Required – Full Year – 1 Credit

Orchestra courses help develop students’ technique for playing string instruments. These courses emphasize collaboration through rehearsal and performance experiences in a range of musical styles. The Chamber Orchestra is an auditioned string ensemble that performs advanced orchestra repertoire of all genres. Instruments in the Chamber Orchestra include violin, viola, cello and upright bass. Students are selected to participate in Chamber Orchestra through an audition at the end of the previous school year.  The Chamber Orchestra performs in the GHS winter and spring concerts.  There are also numerous opportunities for the orchestra members to perform outside of school throughout the year.  In addition to daily class rehearsals, students are expected to attend small group lessons and practice on their own.

Symphony Orchestra

No Audition Required – Full Year – 1 or 1/2 Credit (based on scheduled section)

Orchestra courses help develop students’ technique for playing string instruments. These courses emphasize collaboration through rehearsal and performance experiences in a range of musical styles. Symphony Orchestra is a string ensemble open to students of all ability levels.  The Symphony Orchestra performs intermediate orchestra music of all genres. Instruments in the Symphony Orchestra include violin, viola, cello and upright bass. The Symphony Orchestra performs in the GHS winter and spring concerts. In addition to daily class rehearsals, students are expected to attend small group lessons and practice on their own.

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Science

Living Environment

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 credit

Living Environment follows the New York State Regents core curriculum and is designed to provide the student with a broad and general understanding of the fundamental principles of biology, culminating in the New York State Regents Exam for Living Environment. The topics included in the course are biochemistry, modern evolution, ecology, physiology of both plants and animals, and genetics. Living Environment includes selected laboratory activities that supplement and enhance the classroom topics.

Biology World

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Biology World is offered, upon teacher recommendation, as an alternative to Living Environment.  It follows the New York State Regents Living Environment core curriculum, with its general concepts stressed.  This class offers an extra lab period per schedule rotation .  Students that successfully meet the lab requirement take the New York State Regents Exam for Living Environment at the conclusion of the course.

The Living Environment Honors

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: 92 CLASS AVERAGE AND 92 ON FINAL EXAM IN PREVIOUS SCIENCE COURSE

Living Environment Honors is a course primarily for ninth grade students that have met the course prerequisites and have either completed Earth Science in the eighth grade or that have been recommended for this course by their eighth grade science teacher. The course parallels the New York State Regents Living Environment core curriculum, with substantial quantities of additional information being provided for the enrichment of the students and a greater emphasis on laboratory activities. Students take the New York State Regents Exam for Living Environment at the conclusion of this course.

Earth Science

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Earth Science offers insight into the environment on Earth and the Earth’s environment in space. It presents the concepts and principles essential in understanding the dynamics and history of the Earth. Topics of exploration include oceanography, geology, astronomy, meteorology, and geography. Earth Science lab enhances hands-on experiments designed to supplement instruction in class.

Planet Earth

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

This course follows successful completion of Bio World or Living Environment. It follows the New York State Regents Earth Science core curriculum with general concepts stressed.  This class offers an extra lab period every other day. Students that successfully meet the lab requirement should take the New York State Regents Exam for Earth Science at the conclusion of the course.  This course requires the recommendation of the current Living Environment or Bio World teacher.

Earth Science Honors

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: 92 class average and 92 on final exam in previous science course
Emphasis on mathematical analysis enhances Earth Science Honors as it offers insight into the environment on Earth and the Earth’s environment in space. It presents the concepts and principles essential in understanding the dynamics and history of the Earth. Topics of exploration include oceanography, geology, astronomy, meteorology, and geography. Planet Earth’s extra lab period enhances hands-on experiments designed to supplement instruction in class.

Chemistry

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Chemistry involves studying the composition, properties, and reactions of substances as well as exploration of such concepts as the behaviors of solids, liquids, and gases; acid/base and oxidation/reduction reactions; and atomic structure. Chemical formulas and equations and nuclear reactions are also studied.  Chemistry Lab provides hands-on experiments designed to supplement instruction in Chemistry class.

Chemistry Honors

Grades 10/11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: 92 class average and 92 on final exam in previous science course
With greater emphasis on the mathematical aspects of chemistry and laboratory work, Chemistry Honors involves studying the composition, properties, and reactions of substances as well as exploration of such concepts as the behaviors of solids, liquids, and gasses; acid/base and oxidation/reduction reactions; and atomic structure. Chemical formulas and equations and nuclear reactions are also studied. Chemistry Lab provides hands-on experiments designed to supplement instruction in Chemistry class.

Chemistry in the Community

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Chemistry In the Community is a practical, nonquantitative conceptual Chemistry course designed for students desiring an understanding of chemical concepts and applications. It is a flexible program designed primarily for students that intend to pursue a non science career. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the role of chemistry in our technological society.

SUPA (Syracuse University Project Advance) Chemistry

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: CHEMISTRY

Chemistry 106 and 107 are the introductory lecture and laboratory courses, respectively, of a four-credit course sequence in general Chemistry taught at Syracuse University. In the lecture course, CHE 106, the basic concepts necessary for continued study in Chemistry and other professions requiring the subject—such as medicine, biology, engineering, and physics—are covered. In the laboratory course, CHE 107, basic laboratory procedures and techniques are taught. The grades for the lecture part of the course are based on four tests and a comprehensive final exam. Laboratory grades are based on a student’s performance on individual laboratory exercises and on a comprehensive laboratory final exam. The second half of the course, Chemistry 116 and 117 are the lecture and laboratory courses, respectively, of the four-credit continuation course sequence in general chemistry taught at Syracuse University.  Grades are calculated in the same manner as Chemistry 106 and 107.

AP Biology

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: COMPLETION AND PASSING OF REGENTS EXAM IN LIVING ENVIRONMENT, EARTH SCIENCE AND CHEMISTRY.

Adhering to the curricula recommended by the College Board and designed to parallel college-level introductory Biology courses, AP Biology courses emphasize four general concepts: evolution; cellular processes (energy and communication); genetics and information transfer; and interactions of biological systems. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Biology courses include college-level laboratory investigations. This course has a summer assignment.

Physics

Grades 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Physics involves the study of the forces and laws of nature affecting matter, such as equilibrium, motion, momentum, and the relationships between matter and energy. The study of physics includes the examination of sound, light, and magnetic and electric phenomena. The Physics lab provides hands-on experiments designed to supplement instruction in this Physics course.

AP Physics I

Grades 11/12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 2

Designed by the College Board to parallel first-semester college-level courses in Algebra-based Physics, the AP Physics 1 course focuses on Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound and introductory circuits. This course includes college-level laboratory investigations. This course has a summer assignment.  This class can be taken for credit after completing Physics.

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The Environment

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: LIVING ENVIRONMENT AND EARTH SCIENCE

The Environment is a one-semester course covering topics in basic ecology, world population, soil and agriculture, the water cycle, refuse generation and disposal problems, and energy. In this standards-based course, emphasis will be on the negative environmental impact of many of our current practices and on the exploration and consideration of possible solutions. Students will be encouraged to incorporate ideas into their daily lives.

Ecology

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: LIVING ENVIRONMENT AND EARTH SCIENCE

Ecology is a one semester course covering the topics of pesticide problems, natural pest control methods, water pollution, air pollution, acid rain, the Greenhouse Effect, the depletion of the ozone shield and the risks and economics of pollution. In this standards-based course, various specific examples (Hudson River, Great Lakes) will be studied.

Oceanography I

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: LIVING ENVIRONMENT AND EARTH SCIENCE

Oceanography I is a semester course which emphasizes the biological aspect of the oceans. Adaptations of various life forms are explored with a goal of understanding human impact. This standards-based course integrates aspects of Biology, Earth Science and Chemistry.

Oceanography II

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: LIVING ENVIRONMENT AND EARTH SCIENCE

Oceanography 2 is a semester course which emphasizes the physical aspects of the ocean, including topics in light, temperature, pressure, sound and water chemistry. In this standards-based course, aspects of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Science are integrated.

Forensics I

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: LIVING ENVIRONMENT AND EARTH SCIENCE

Forensics 1 will help students understand and appreciate the world of a crime scene investigator. This course will combine hands-on laboratory experiences with real world scenarios to show students the “Real CSI.” Some of the topics that will be explored are forensic anthropology, forensic entomology, fingerprints, DNA, blood spatter, forensic toxicology and arson.

Forensics II

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: LIVING ENVIRONMENT AND EARTH SCIENCE

Forensics 2 will help students understand and appreciate the world of a crime scene investigator. This course will combine hands-on laboratory experiences with real world scenarios to show students the “Real CSI.” Some topics that will be explored are forensic botany, environmental forensics, glass analysis, the forensics of car crashes and document analysis.

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Social Studies

Global History 9

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

This course is the first year of a two-year course that culminates with a Regent’s examination in Global History for all students at the conclusion of their second year. It is a New York State requirement that all students pass this examination in order to receive a high school diploma. Global History 9 uses a chronological approach to world history, with a variety of historical themes woven into the presentation of materials. Units of study include the Ancient World Civilizations and Religions, including the rise and fall of empires (4000 B.C.E. to 500 C.E.); expanding zones of exchange and encounter (500 C.E. to 1200 C.E.); global interactions (1200 C.E. to 1650 C.E.), the first global age (1850 to 1770); and the age of revolutions (1750 to 1914).

World History 9H & AP World History

Grades 9/10 – Full Year – 1 Credit Each

NOTE: This two year course replaces Global History and Geography I and II. This is a college-level course. It is academically demanding and requires a significant commitment on the part of the student.

Advanced Placement World History is a two-year Advanced Placement program (grades 9 and 10). The Advanced Placement Program offers a course and exam in World History to qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in world history. The purpose of this course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in interaction with different human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. Areas of study include: Core topics begin with the Foundation period of prehistory to 1000 CE, which will serve as the basis during the rest of the program for a more in-depth study of global history and civilization of the past 1,000 years. This course also covers the material outlined in the course description for Global History and Geography I and II.

For World History 9H, a Department final exam based on the content, concepts and themes in this curriculum and modeled after the World History Advanced Placement exam will be administered in June.

For Advanced Placement World History, all students take the NYS Global History and Geography Regents examination in June. Students must pass this course and the Global History and Geography Regents exam in order to graduate. Students in this course are also expected to take the Advanced Placement World History exam in May. There is a fee for this exam which is determined by the College Board and is the responsibility of the student.

Global History 10

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

This is the second year of the two-year course in Global History. A review of world geography and other important concepts from Global History 9 will begin the year. Units of study in 10th grade will include the age of absolutism and revolutions; the industrial revolution and the growth of nationalism and imperialism; the world at war (World War I, the Russian Revolution, and World War II); the world since 1945; global connections and interactions today. Students will finish the year with a comprehensive review to help them successfully complete the Global History Regents examination.

United States History and Government

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

U.S. History and Government (Framework) courses provide students with an overview of the history of the United States, examining time periods from discovery or colonialism through World War II or after. These courses typically include a historical overview of political, military, scientific, and social developments. Course content may include a history of the North American peoples before European settlement.

AP United States History

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, AP U.S. History courses provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critical problems and materials in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines the discovery and settlement of the New World through the recent past.

Economics

Grade 12 – One Semester –1/2 Credit

The objective of this course is to impart a general understanding of the various components of the economy (micro-economics) and how these components work together in the total economic picture (macroeconomics). Students will learn to use economic concepts in a reasoned, careful manner to prepare them to deal with personal, community, national, and international economic issues that they will confront as young citizens.

College Economics

Grade 12 – One Semester –1/2 Credit

This course replaces the required Participation in Economics class with a higher level, college course offered through Ramapo College.

Microeconomics studies the motivations, incentives and constraints on individuals in their market decision-making, and the effect these decisions have on society. As a result of the decisions by consumers and producers, prices are determined and goods and services are accordingly allocated. The students are provided with an analytical perspective to think critically about market systems and the social objectives it may serve. The major emphasis of the class is to understand the supply-and-demand paradigm, but topics such as utility theory, market structure and government intervention into the market are covered. The goals of the class include learning specific terms and economic models, understanding the way in which economists approach problems, recognizing issues of economic importance and analyzing the effect government policies have on individuals.

Participation in Government

Grade 12 – One Semester –1/2 Credit

These courses examine a particular topic pertaining to U.S. government and political institutions rather than provide a general overview of the subject. They may concentrate on one of many topics related to governmental structure, function, and purposes, such as the Constitution, the Supreme Court, Congress, or the Office of the President.

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American Law Honors

Grade 12 – One Semester –1/2 Credit

This is a one-semester course that meets the New York State requirement for government and may be taken in place of the Participation in Government course. Students will examine the various aspects of United States law and its practice. Topics will include constitutional law, civil rights and liberties, political ideology, and current issues in American government. Activities will include several debates, case studies, individual and group research, and participation in political simulations. As a culminating activity, each student will be expected to present a written legal brief and oral arguments before a panel of attorneys, administrators, and teachers.

SUPA (Syracuse University Project Advance) Introduction to Public Policy Analysis

Grade 12 – One Semester –1/2 Credit

Public Affairs 101: Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy is designed to provide students with basic research, communication, and decision-making skills used in public policy analysis. In addition, students are required to read and analyze articles in The New York Times on local, state, and international public policy issues. The instructor determines which public policy issues are chosen for study throughout the semester.

The content coverage of the course, while important, is secondary to the development of a range of applied social science skills that will help the student make more informed choices as a citizen, worker, and consumer. These include the ability to define and identify the components of public policy issues; communicate ideas and findings with respect to public policy issues; collect information on public policy issues; use graphs, tables, and statistics to analyze public policy; examine the use of surveys and informal interviewing procedures; identify a social problem and come up with a proposed public policy to deal with it; list the benefits and costs of a proposed public policy; forecast the impact of the policy on societal conditions; analyze the political factors and develop strategies to implement a proposed public policy; identify essential features of major current public policy issues; apply skills to Syracuse University and outside the university; and work in teams effectively.

AP European History

Grades 11/12 – Full Year – One Credit

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level European History courses, AP European History courses examine European civilization from the High Renaissance period to the recent past and also expose students to the factual narrative. In addition, these courses help students develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history and the abilities to analyze historical evidence and to express that understanding and analysis in writing.

Civic Action and Leadership

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Students enrolled in the Civic Action and Leadership elective will create individual “civic action” projects designed to answer the essential question of the course: “How can a person bring about positive change in their community?” Students are encouraged to utilize their skills, interests and passions to create a project that has meaning to them. Although the main goal of the projects is to help their communities, students also learn through experience about different organizations, government agencies, and community leaders that also deal with local issues. By reflecting throughout the entire process, students also learn valuable lessons in time management, public speaking and various other skills needed as they pursue higher levels of education and their career paths. Students will also build their “social capital” by building relationships through networking and community involvement.

Criminal Justice

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

This course will introduce students to the fundamental foundations and structures of the criminal justice system in the United States. The rules of criminal procedure at the federal and state level will be analyzed in relation to the three levels of the American criminal justice system: the police, the courts, and corrections. Using crime statistics and court system analysis, the components of the criminal justice system will be studied. Students will gain an overall understanding of the structure and practice of our somewhat imperfect system.

Future Teachers

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

This college level course offered through Ramapo College is a study of the history, development, organization, and practices of preschool, elementary, and secondary education. All students will participate in a field experience with a cooperating teacher during the course. It is highly recommended that students who are planning to pursue a career in education, educational administration, counseling, or social work take this course. Students will examine the issue of self-esteem and how this impacts the classroom; discover their learning preferences and how this knowledge will help them both as a college student and future educator; and examine and observe human growth and development theories in diverse classroom settings. Students will be introduced to the exceptional learner, explore various barriers to learning, and recognize the role that diversity and culturally relevant learning experiences play in classrooms.

History Through Film and Literature

Grades 10 (with department approval), 11 & 12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

History Through Film examines historical narratives by comparing actual events and their on screen representations. Students will analyze what  and how major historical themes were represented in film, and how they changed over time.

Local Government and Leadership

Grades 11/12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

This elective is designed to introduce high school students to the functions and structure of local government, as well as the leadership skills necessary for effective civic engagement. Through interactive lectures, discussions, group projects, and problem-based learning, students will gain an understanding of the role of local government in their community, the various branches and levels of government, and the responsibilities and challenges of elected officials and citizens alike. The course will also emphasize the importance of ethical decision-making, communication, and collaboration in leadership.

Psychology

Grade 12 (Grade 11 with department approval) – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

Psychology courses introduce students to the study of individual human behavior. Course content typically includes (but is not limited to) an overview of the field of psychology, topics in human growth and development, personality and behavior, abnormal psychology, and mindfulness activities to promote social and emotional well-being.

Sociology

Grades 11/12 – One Semester –1/2 Credit

Sociology is a one semester course elective that challenges students to participate in dialogue about the interactions between human beings living together.  Sociologists study diverse topics such as sports, medicine, the prison system, biology, economic systems and family groups. In fact, there is no end to what can be evaluated using sociology as a base. It is limited only by an individual’s sociological imagination.  In our semester course students will experience simulations, debates, experiments, and activities that will motivate further thinking on how society functions.  Participation is a key component in the functionality of this class. And yes, this is the class with the flour baby.

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Special Education

Learning Lab

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – No Credit

Learning Lab is a small group setting in which students who qualify for special education services receive reinforcement of academic skills in the content areas. English, math, science, social studies and study skills are addressed. Academic skills are re-taught, reinforced and/or reviewed to promote success in mainstream classes.

Inclusion Class

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Inclusion classes in English, math, social studies, and science are conducted by a content area teacher and a special education teacher working together as “co-teachers.” This creates a successful learning environment for all students in the class, including special education students who may need additional support. All students in these classes are challenged to reach the same academic goals and are evaluated by the same Regents exams at the conclusion of the course.

PAES

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – No Credit

PAES is a dynamic curriculum that operates in a simulated work environment. Students become employees; teachers become supervisors. Strict work procedures are followed so students get the feel of real work, at the same time learn and explore new careers/vocational areas. Students are paid to explore Multiple Work Areas using Hands-On Jobs. Students can be paid with simulated money and paychecks through the Money Manager Program. Students spend their earned money during payday’s when payroll is dispersed, and the PAES store/movie theater is open.

PAES provides:

  • Work and Life Skill Training
  • Vocational Work Assessment
  • Work Exploration
  • Appropriate Work Behavior Development
  • Data Collection and Student Reporting
  • An Accurate Description of Student Performance and Employment Potential

Money Manager program provides:

  • The Value of Money
  • Academic Monetary Concepts
  • Money Related Math
  • Checkbook Management
  • Managing Cash Responsibility
  • Consequences for One’s Actions
  • Preparation for Life

Algebra I-A

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

This course is the first year of a two year program which is designed for students who need to build a foundation for Algebra 1. Students will cover approximately half of the Algebra 1 curriculum this year and then the remaining topics in Algebra 1-B. Graphing calculator use will be introduced throughout the year.

Algebra I-B

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

This course is designed for students who have completed Algebra 1-A. Students will review material from Algebra 1-A as well as learn the remainder of the Algebra 1 topics. At the end of this year, students will have completed all of the material necessary to take the Algebra Regents exam. Graphing calculator use will be introduced throughout the year.

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STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Arts Math)

3-D Making (Formerly known as Computer Integrated Manufacturing)

Grades 10-12  – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: DESIGN AND DRAWING FOR PRODUCTION

In the 3-D Making course, students will build on computer solid modeling skills while using computer numerical control (CNC) equipment to produce actual models of their three-dimensional designs. Course topics may also include fundamental concepts of robotics, automated manufacturing, and design analysis. Some of the equipment used will include, 3d printers, Laser cutters, plasma cutter, water jet and CNC routers.

Robotics

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Robotics courses help students develop and expand their skills and knowledge of robotics and related scientific and engineering topics. Course topics may include principles of mechanics, electronics, hydraulics, pneumatics, programmable logic controllers. These courses may emphasize the use of engineering principles to design and build robots, construct and connect sensors, and program robots in the programming language.

Discovering Computer Science

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

This course is designed as an introduction to computer science for high school students who want to express themselves creatively and solve problems that are interesting to them using computational devices.  This course is designed for students that have little or no experience studying computer science.  Through a series of engaging, hands-on labs and projects, students learn the fundamentals of computer programming using the block-based language Netsblox.  Students will also study the world wide web, designing and creating their own websites by writing their own HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.  Finally, students will explore drawing, animation, and problem solving using Python.  Throughout the course, computing history and current events in computer science will be incorporated.  Special topics in computer science such as diversity, privacy, laws and regulation, artificial intelligence, assistive technology, and others will be incorporated.

Siena College Computer Science Python & Multimedia

Grades 10-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: DISCOVERING COMPUTER SCIENCE

This course is a broad introduction to a variety of fundamental topics in computer science through a contemporary theme such as robotics, the web, graphics, or gaming. Students will consider problems in the application area that can be solved with software. Using the theme of the course, students will be introduced to important areas of computer science including abstraction, computer organization, representation of information, history of computing, ethics, and the development and evaluation of algorithmic solutions using an appropriate programming environment.

Siena College Computer Science Java and Data Structures (formerly titled Java & Multimedia)

Grades 11/12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: SIENA COLLEGE COMPUTER SCIENCE PYTHON AND MULTIMEDIA

An introduction to the object-oriented design paradigm with an emphasis on problem solving, algorithm development, and implementation of algorithms as computer programs in an object-oriented language. Other topics will include data representation, programming style, program testing and analysis of algorithms.

Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) Cyber Security

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Discovering Computer Science, Siena CS Python and Multimedia and Siena CS Java and Data Structure

SUPA Cyber Security is a course that presents fundamental concepts of security, network organization, and operation.

This course will introduce mechanisms and the history of software, hardware, and OS security. Students will differentiate between physical, organizational, and personal security. Introduction to Cybersecurity consists of two lectures per week based on reference text and course notes. In addition, two hands-on labs will be conducted each week based on the Lab Manual for the course. Students will receive one homework assignment and one quiz each week. The homework assignment will be due the first class of the following week. There are no prerequisites for this course.

By the end of the course, students will be able to understand how a network functions, monitor a network’s functions and performance, control a network’s configuration, determine what security is and how it relates to a network, detect and respond to an attack on a network, determine if a network is vulnerable to an attack, identify the threats to a network, prevent harm to a network, and analyze the impact.

Drone Technology: Programming, Design and Compliance

Grades 10-12 – One Semester – 1/2 Credit

This course offers a complete and immersive experience into the fascinating world of drone technology, combining elements of programming, design, and operation with an emphasis on compliance with regulatory standards. Beginning with basic drone programming and advancing through hands-on flight training, design intricacies, and safety protocols, the program is structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of both indoor and outdoor drone operations. Students are engaged in practical simulations, construction, and configuration of various drone models, acquiring critical skills and knowledge applicable to real-world scenarios.

Design and Drawing for Production

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Design and Drawing for Production (DDP) is an approved course to meet the one unit of art/music requirement for graduation for all students. The DDP syllabus is aligned with Standard 5 of the Mathematics, Science and Technology (MST) Learning Standards and the Visual Arts Learning Standards.

Materials Processing: Wood

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – 1/2 Credit

Wood Processing/Production courses allow students to study the physical and chemical properties of woods and composites made from woods and to use these materials to construct usable products according to industry standards. These courses enable students to experience the process of translating an idea into a finished product, with instruction in planning, designing, selecting materials, and using tools and machines.

Advanced Materials Processing: Wood

Grades 9-12 – Full Year – 1/2 Credit

PREREQUISITE: MATERIALS PROCESSING: WOOD

The advanced materials processing wood course provides students with experience in constructing interior furniture. Students learn to distinguish between various types of furniture construction and their appropriate applications, and how to use various woodworking machines and power tools for cutting and shaping wood. Cabinetmaking courses cover the different methods of joining pieces of wood, how to use mechanical fasteners, and how to attach hardware. Initial topics may resemble those taught in Woodworking courses; more advanced topics may include how to install plastic laminates on surfaces and how to apply spray finishes.

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World Languages

Spanish I

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Designed to introduce students to Spanish language and culture, Spanish I courses prepare students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on a variety of topics. In Spanish I students cover “Checkpoint A” of the New York State syllabus. Topics introduced during the year include School and Education, Personal Identification, Weather and Seasons, Holidays, Sports and Leisure, House and Family, and Health. Spanish I introduces the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking cultures through projects in which students compare the American and Hispanic cultures. Spanish I culminates in a departmental final examination.

Spanish II

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: SPANISH I AND PASSING GRADE ON CHECKPOINT A EXAM IF TAKEN IN EIGHTH GRADE

Prerequisite: Spanish I and passing grade on Checkpoint A exam if taken in eighth grade
Spanish II courses build upon skills developed in Spanish I, preparing students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on concrete topics. Spanish II courses introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking cultures. The thematic units covered in Spanish II include school life and education, leisure, weather and geography, the fine arts, house and home, shopping, communities and neighborhoods, and family relationships.  At the end of this course, students take a departmental final exam.  In Spanish II, students are preparing for “Checkpoint B” of the New York State syllabus in Spanish language.

Spanish III

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: SPANISH II

Spanish III courses prepare students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics, including connections to other subject areas. These courses expand students’ knowledge of relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking countries and cultures. In Spanish III, students continue to cover “Checkpoint B” of the New York State syllabus. Thematic topics covered include Personal Identification, Travel, Food, Holidays, Manners & Etiquette, and Professions. This course culminates in the Spanish Checkpoint B examination according to the New York State requirements.

Spanish IV

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: SPANISH III

Spanish IV courses prepare students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics, including connections to other subject areas. Thematic topics covered include but are not limited to family life, physical/personal description, travel, occupations, and food. Spanish IV courses promote students’ understanding of the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about Spain and its geography, culture, and history. The study of Spanish literature is introduced through excerpts from famous short stories in addition to reading ancient legends from Spain. Students end the year by writing an autobiography in Spanish.

Spanish V

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: SPANISH IV AND PASSING GRADE ON CHECKPOINT B EXAM

Spanish V courses prepare students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics, including connections to other subject areas. Spanish V courses promote students’ understanding of the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking countries and cultures. This class is designed for advanced Spanish students who have successfully completed Spanish IV and are academically prepared for college-level courses. Students will continue their development in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding the language through a systematic review of its structure. Students will also explore Spanish civilizations through representative readings. There will be a midterm and final exam to assess students’ language skills each semester.

French I

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Designed to introduce students to French language and culture, French I courses prepare students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on a variety of topics. They introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking cultures. In French I students cover “Checkpoint A” of the New York State syllabus. Thematic topics covered include Personal Identity, School and Education, House and Family, and Food. Besides thematic based conversations, students engage in student-centered, interactive activities to provide opportunity to practice their newly acquired second language. Cultural understanding is developed as students compare and contrast American and French cultures on a regular basis.

French II

Grade 9 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: FRENCH I AND PASSING GRADE ON CHECKPOINT A EXAM IF TAKEN IN EIGHTH GRADE

French II courses build upon skills developed in French I, preparing students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on concrete topics. French II courses introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking cultures as students compare and contrast American and French cultures on a regular basis. French II students are preparing for Checkpoint B of the New York State Syllabus. The thematic units covered in French II include school life and education, leisure, weather and geography, the fine arts, house and home, shopping, communities and neighborhoods, and family relationships. Situational conversation practice in the target language continues to be stressed for each thematic unit.

French III

Grade 10 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: FRENCH II

French III courses prepare students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics, including connections to other subject areas. These courses expand students’ knowledge of relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking countries and cultures. In French III, students continue to cover “Checkpoint B” of the New York State syllabus. Thematic topics covered include Personal Identification, Travel, Food, Holidays, Manners & Etiquette, and Health & Wellness. This course culminates in the French final examination according to the New York State requirements.

French IV

Grade 11 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: FRENCH III

French IV courses prepare students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics, including connections to other subject areas. The thematic topics learned in this course include Vacation, Weather, Family, Cultural Events, Earning a Living, Social Media and Environment. French IV courses promote students’ understanding of the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking countries and cultures. The study of literature is introduced with The Little Prince. Discussion of this work will be in French.

SUNY Orange French V (French 203/204)

Grade 12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: FRENCH IV AND PASSING GRADE ON CHECKPOINT B EXAM

French V courses prepare students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics, including connections to other subject areas. French V courses promote students’ understanding of the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking countries and cultures. In this college level French course, students will work through the first half of a teacher chosen text. Students will read literary selections and cultivate sensibility and sensitivity to French culture, history, and art. Students will understand and apply intermediate to advanced French grammar through oral and written assignments. Finally, students will ask and answer questions in French expressing judgment, doubt and uncertainty.   In the second semester of the college-level sequence, students will complete the second half of the text used in French 203. They will also chronologically advance their knowledge of French culture, history and art and continue their study of French grammar with emphasis on written and oral expression.

Intro to Latin Honors

Grades 10-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

Designed to introduce students to Latin language and culture, Latin I courses prepare students to communicate authentically in Latin by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on a variety of topics. They introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Latin-speaking cultures. Because most students who enroll in Latin already have experience in another foreign language, this course begins with a rapid presentation of the fundamental structure of Latin and intense practice in vocabulary, culture and derivation. There is an emphasis on reading development, and students will work individually, with peer partners and in groups. Projects include studies of mythology and Latin derivatives in English. Roman culture is illustrated daily and students have the opportunity to participate in a Saturnalia party.

Advanced Latin Honors

Grades 10-12 – Full Year – 1 Credit

PREREQUISITE: INTRO TO LATIN H

Latin II courses build upon skills developed in Latin I, preparing students to communicate authentically in Latin by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on concrete topics. Latin II courses introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Latin-speaking cultures. As such, Advanced Latin is a continuation of the work that was started in the Intro to Latin course. The subjunctive and gerundive are taught before students graduate to reading many of the famous Latin works: Livy, Caesar and Pliny. Projects will include studies of Roman authors, culture and history. Students will take the National Latin Exam in March and the NYS Checkpoint B final examination in Latin at the end of the year.

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